Category: Insurance

What is a Health Savings Account (HSA)?

A Health Savings Account (HSA) is a convenient way to store funds specifically for medical expenses. If you qualify for an HSA, you will get to enjoy a few tax advantages as well. While this might sound like an ideal setup, not everyone is eligible for a health savings account. To qualify for a health savings account, you must be enrolled in a high-deductible health insurance plan (HDHP). The details of these plans are revised every year by the Internal Service Revenue (IRS), which sets the bar for:

  • The minimum deductible a plan must have to be considered a HDHP.
  • The maximum amount that a customer who purchases a plan is able to spend out-of-pocket.

The benefits of a health savings account

Here are some of the key advantages of having a health savings account:

  • It covers a large variety of medical expenses: There are many different kinds of medical expenses that are eligible, such as medical, dental and mental health services.
  • Pretty much anyone can make contributions: Contributions to your health savings account don’t have to be made by you or your spouse. Employers, relatives, friends or anyone who would like to contribute to your account can do so. There are limits, however. For example, in 2019, the limit for individuals was $3,500 and $7,000 for families.
  • Pre-tax contributions: Since contributions are generally made at your employer pre-taxes, they are not considered to be part of your gross income and are not federally taxed. This is usually the same case when it comes to state level taxes as well.
  • After-tax contributions are tax-deductible: Any contributions made after taxes are deductible from your gross income on your tax return. Doing so minimizes the amount you would owe on taxes for that year.
  • Tax-free withdrawals: You can withdrawal money from your account for approved health care costs without having to worry about federal taxes. Most states do not tax, either.
  • Annual rollover: Any unused HSA funds that are left over by the end of the year get rolled over to the following year.
  • Portability: Even if you change health insurance plans, employers, or retire, the money in your health savings account will continue to be available for qualifying health care expenses.
  • Having a health savings account is convenient: Most of the time, you will receive a debit card that is connected to your health savings account. This way, you can use your debit card to start paying for eligible expenses and prescription drugs on the spot.

The drawbacks to having a health savings account

While there are many advantages to having a health savings account, there are a few things to consider. For one, in order to qualify for an HSA, you must hold a high-deductible health insurance plan. The tax benefits might entice you to purposely sign up for insurance coverage under one of these health plans but think before doing this. Here are some of the disadvantages to having a health savings account:

  • The High-Deductible Health Plan: These types of health plans can end up being a lot more expensive in the long run, even with an HSA. If you have other options for health insurance that offer lower deductible, definitely consider those and don’t only choose a High-Deductible plan so that you can open an HSA.
  • You need to stay on top of your spending: If you have an HSA, you need to be willing to hold yourself responsible for recordkeeping. Keep track of all of your receipts so that you can prove you spent your HSA funds on eligible expenses.
  • Taxes and penalties: Using money from your HSA on other expenses that do not qualify as eligible health care expenses could result in you owing taxes. If you do this before the age of 65, you will have to pay taxes with a 20% penalty tacked on. If you are 65 or older, you will be responsible for paying taxes, but the penalty gets waived.
  • Fees: Sometimes, health savings accounts will charge additional fees, either per month or per transaction. Check with your HSA institution for more information on extra fees.

How an HSA works

In many cases, if your employer offers high-deductible health plans, they probably offer health savings accounts as well. Talk to your employer to find out what they offer. If your employer doesn’t offer HSAs, then you can sign up for a separate one through a different institution.

You get to decide how much you would like to contribute to your HSA annually, but keep in mind that you cannot exceed the HSA contribution limit. Once you are set up with an account, you will either receive a debit card or a series of checks that are linked to your HSA. Right away, you will be able to use the funds in your account for:

  • Deductibles
  • Copays
  • Coinsurance
  • Other eligible health care expenses that your insurance does not cover.

Generally, you cannot use HSA funds to pay your insurance premiums.  HSAs are not the same as flexible spending accounts, because HSAs rollover. Once you turn 65, you are no longer eligible to make contributions to your account, but you can still use the available funds for eligible out-of-pocket expenses. If you use the funds for non-eligible expenses, you will owe taxes on these amounts.

Investment Opportunities

Another benefit of HSA that you may or may not have heard of is that you can invest the money in mutual funds and stocks. If this is something that you are interested in, seek advice from a financial advisor for more information.

What is a Health Savings Account (HSA)? is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com

Find The Best Minneapolis Neighborhood for You | ApartmentSearch

Find your ideal apartment community in Minneapolis with insider intel on the city’s top neighborhoods, local hotspots, and eateries.

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How to Prevent 3 Common Summer Pests | ApartmentSearch

Summer is full of pesky outdoor pests. But when those pests move into your apartment, things can get crowded quick! Help prevent them with these simple tips.

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Looking for a roommate who you like and trust? Follow this guide.

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Spring + Summer Recipes to Fill Your Instagram Feed

SUMMER-RECIPES-TOO-PRETTY-TO-EAT

It’s officially May and that means summer is just around the corner!!  While a lot of things have changed this year, my love of summer remains!  Bring on the warm weather…am I right?  Along with sundresses and sunglasses comes a whole bunch of fresh fruits and vegetables I can’t wait to get my hands on.  The delicious recipes below from some of my favorite bloggers will all be in heavy rotation for the next month.  If you need a refreshing cocktail to go along with these delicious bites, bookmark these summer cocktails for your next read.

SUMMER PEACH BALSAMIC CAPRESE SALAD

Make-Ahead Recipes | Meal Prep Guide | One-Pot Tomato, Chickpea, and Orzo Pasta
via Whole and Heavenly Oven

GET THE RECIPE

STRIPED JUICE POPSICLES

Make-Ahead Recipes | Meal Prep Guide | Slow Cooker Butter Bean Minestrone
via The View From Great Island

GET THE RECIPE

TOMATO, PEACH, & BURRATA SALAD

Make-Ahead Recipes | Meal Prep Guide | Cucumber Quinoa Salad
via Two Peas & Their Pod

GET THE RECIPE

STRAWBERRY GOAT CHEESE CROSTINI

Make-Ahead Recipes | Meal Prep Guide | Winter Kale Salad
via Foodess

GET THE RECIPE

BAKED RATATOUILLE TIAN

Make-Ahead Recipes | Meal Prep Guide | Pizza Pasta Salad
via KELLIES FOOD TO GLOW

GET THE RECIPE

SUMMER FRUIT BREAKFAST BAKE

Make-Ahead Recipes | Meal Prep Guide | Rustic Polenta Casserole
via Eazy Peazy Mealz

GET THE RECIPE

BLUEBERRY BREAD PUDDING

Make-Ahead Recipes | Meal Prep Guide | Enchilada Stuffed Sweet Potatoes
via Spicy Southern Kitchen

GET THE RECIPE

Read Spring + Summer Recipes to Fill Your Instagram Feed on Apartminty.

Source: blog.apartminty.com

Amenities to Look for When Working From Home | Apartment Search

Ready to upgrade your work-from-home lifestyle? Many apartments are upping the ante. Learn about the top amenities to look for when working from your apartment.

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A Cozy New Rug Collection

Hello friends! Praise be, the election is over and I just marked my birthday over the weekend – my official holiday season milestone. Whenever the calendar passes November 8, I feel like I can finally turn 100% of my attention to all things holiday. Obviously, the holidays are going to look and feel very different than years past. Perhaps instead of the holiday season, we should start referring to the next few months as the hunker down season. Because that’s what holidays in the time of Covid are going to require of us. But I’m not entirely mad about the idea of holing up at home. I’ll take a very valid excuse to look for ways to make my home as cozy, comforting, and beautiful as possible.

Enter the new rug collection from Beni Rugs, designed by my style soul twin, Colin King.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

Called the Shape of Color, this new rug collection offers eleven Moroccan style rugs. Each rug features shocks of color inspired by Tangier and Marrakech. The hues are deeply saturated in simple geometric shapes or big bold stripes.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

While I typically eschew color, rugs are a wonderful spot to inject something fresh into a room. I used a bold colored rug in my own living room. The particularly nice thing about a rug – it’s an easy way to reenergize a space without really having to change anything else.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34 A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34 A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

There are a few secrets to picking out a rug. First, you want to think about size. A common mistake is getting a rug that is too small. You want all (or nearly all) your furniture in a space to sit on your rug. That helps a room feel anchored and like everything is working together. A too-small rug will actually make a small space feel even smaller!

Next, you want to think about foot traffic. If you’re looking to put a rug in a high foot traffic area, you’ll want to ensure any rug you select will withstand an onslaught of dirt and use.

Finally, when adding a colorful rug to your space you don’t need to “match your decor. You just want to keep everything in the same design family. Do you decorate with mostly warm colors or cooler tones? That will help you pick your colors.



 

If you’re looking to upgrade the coziness of your home before the holidays hit, I definitely think one of these rugs would be a great way to do it. I’m already debating which one I might add to our house. I do have a home office refresh in the works! If I pick out one of these rugs – I’ll be sure to share.

How are you planning on sprucing up your spaces for the holidays?

images c/o beni rugs

The post A Cozy New Rug Collection appeared first on Apartment34.

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Under 30? 10 Reasons You Should Rent Furniture | ApartmentSearch

When you’re under 30, your lifestyle might not gel with buying expensive and inconvenient new furniture. Here’s why you should rent instead, with ApartmentSearch.

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Shack Up: 10 Two Bedrooms Around the City | Apartminty

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc, or its affiliates.

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How to Find Affordable Life Insurance

Life insurance can be expensive and if it’s essential those high costs can leave a nasty taste in your mouth. You may wonder if it’s worth purchasing a policy at all, which could place your family in jeopardy as they won’t have the cover they need when you pass. 

However, there are a few ways you can bring those costs down and get affordable life insurance. So, don’t despair, and take a look at these top tips for cheap life insurance.

How are Life Insurance Payouts and Premiums Judged?

Insurance underwriters set your premiums and your payout based on the likelihood that you will die during the term. It sounds pretty morbid, but these are for-profit companies we’re talking about and when death is your only liability, there’s no time for gentility. 

It’s something that frustrates everyone who has ever been quoted high premiums, but it’s important to see things from the perspective of the underwriter. If you’re 100 pounds over your ideal weight, your risk of heart disease, cancer, and countless other diseases increases, and you become more of a liability. 

It doesn’t matter how much you convince them that you’re on a diet and will lose all of that weight eventually—as things stand right now, you’re more of a liability than someone who weighs 100 pounds less.

Of course, it’s possible to be 140 pounds and unhealthy, just as it’s possible to be 240 pounds and healthy, and this is an argument that many applicants make. But those are the exceptions. The oldest woman ever smoked until the day she died and made it halfway through her 122nd year, and everyone knows of at least one smoker that continued the habit well into their 70th and 80th year, seemingly unaffected. 

However, the average smoker will die 10 years before their non-smoking counterpart and their risk of contracting a host of diseases increases exponentially for every decade that they stick with the habit. Should a life insurance company dismiss your habit just because of a 122-year-old French woman? Of course not. 

These are statistics and probabilities; they focus on the most likely and the most common. By their very nature, there will always be exceptions and outliers. A life insurance company doesn’t care about any of these because as long as they focus on the events that are most likely (obese policyholders and smokers will die young; preexisting medical conditions are more likely to reoccur than if they didn’t exist at all) the premiums will exceed the payouts and they will turn a profit. 

Start Early

The sooner you apply for life insurance, the better your chances of getting a high payout and a low premium. Age is one of the biggest factors in determining your mortality risk. A 20-year-old has a high chance of surviving a 30-year-term, but for every additional year, those odds decline and by the time they hit 55, the odds are no longer in their favor.

Starting early doesn’t just protect your loved ones if you die before your time, it also gives you more options. This is when whole life insurance policies are at their most beneficial. These will payout regardless, even if you live to be 100. The life insurance company will still benefit, however, because many of these policies either lapse because of non-payment (a lot can happen in those 80 years) or the policyholder takes the cash value.

They’re like a life insurance policy and saving account bundled into one, but they become less viable as you age.

Make Big Changes

You probably knew this tip was going to be here, but it’s worth mentioning: If you smoke, stop; if you’re obese, lose weight. We can’t stress enough how much of a difference these things will make to your life insurance application.

If you’re a smoker and you’re obese, you’re a massive liability. Statistically speaking, you’ll be beating the odds if you make it to your 60th year, which means a 30-year term stops being a viable option when you’re just 31! If that’s not enough to scare you, then there’s nothing we can say that will.

By quitting cigarettes and dropping a few dozen pounds, you improve your chances of living a long and full life, which, in turn, means you’ll get cheaper life insurance premiums.

And these are not the only changes you should consider making. Many applicants fail to calculate just how much of a liability they become when they partake in extreme sports and activities such as base jumping, parkour, sky diving, and rock climbing. Some of these are riskier than others, but in all cases, the underwriter will compare them to the averages to determine your likelihood of dying young.

Roughly 10 skydivers will die for every 1 million that jump on a regular basis. However, more than 40 times as many will die from base jumping and you’re 30 times more likely to die from extreme mountaineering than you are from base jumping. 

Some of these are less risky than you might think. For instance, you’re twice as likely to die from walking than you are from horseback riding, as the former puts you at risk of major pedestrian accidents. 

You’re also more likely to die from getting out of bed aged 45 than you are from SCUBA diving. So, assess the risks, try to look at your situation from the underwriter’s perspective, and make changes where necessary without giving up all the things that you enjoy.

Wait

You can apply for life insurance as soon as you lose weight or give up risky and dangerous activities. You can reap the benefits straight away when you do this, but the same can’t be said for everything. 

Smoking is a great example of this. If you quit smoking today, you will need to wait at least 12 months before that has an impact on your life insurance policy. It only makes sense when you consider the majority of short-term cessations will result in relapse. 

The underwriter also wants to protect their bottom line, because you won’t start feeling the health benefits until several months have passed and before that time elapses, you’re still a high risk for many diseases and conditions.

Look for Group Life Insurance 

If you can’t get life insurance by applying directly, you may be offered it through an employer. Group life insurance is offered to large groups of people and is typically provided by employers.

You probably won’t get the same extensive cover, but you will get some cover, and this is a great alternative if you’re struggling to seal the deal yourself.

Only Buy What You Need

It’s tempting to get a big payout when you’re buying life insurance as that payout can then provide a good life for your loved ones. But life insurance shouldn’t be like winning the lottery. It’s not designed to allow them to quit work and spend the rest of their lives sipping champagne on Mediterranean cruises.

The payout should cover all of their needs for several years, while also repaying any debts that you (or your loved ones) have. If you have a mortgage, it can also go towards repaying this.

Many life insurance experts recommend that you stick with the absolute basics in situations where the remaining family members can still support themselves. For instance, let’s suppose that you’re a 50-year man in relatively good health. You earn roughly the same money as your wife, but she’s 10 years younger than you and you also have a son at college and a mortgage with $50,000 left to pay.

In this case, the payout should be at least $50,000, plus the size of remaining debts. However, you don’t need to include all debts in this. Some debts, including all federal student loans, will die with you, which means your son or your wife won’t be burdened with them. For example, if you cosigned on a $20,000 federal student loan and also have $10,000 in joint credit card debt, a death benefit of $60,000 will be enough.

That way, your wife can clear the mortgage and debt in full, thus reducing monthly liabilities and putting more money in her pocket at the end of the money. If she ever faces a financial crisis, such as the loss of a job, she’ll have a fully paid house to use as collateral and can take loans and equity loans as needed.

This is the best way to provide for your family after your death without crippling your finances in the present.

And Finally, Take Your Time

The sooner you apply, the better. But that applies to years and not weeks, so don’t feel like you need to rush. If you’re not sure about the process and need a little advice, spend some more time reading through articles and guides and speaking with current policyholders.

Providing yourself with a little extra shopping time will also make it easier to compare and to find the best life insurance rates and the best payouts based on your specific budget and situation.

How to Find Affordable Life Insurance is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com